Saturday, June 19, 2010

Clap Clap

Last night Nat watched the NZ Maori rugby team play Ireland. Understandably, the game was broadcast on the Moari Television channel.

Before the game, we caught the end of the preceding show called "Homai te Pakipaki".

As I left the room Nat called out "Homai te Pakipaki!"
I responded with two claps. Clap clap.
I said to Nat, "You know what that means right?"
Nat: "'Time to Sing' or something like that." (I guess it's a singing talent show or something)
Me: "Noooo... It means 'Give me a Clap'."
Nat: "No."
Me: "Yes. 'Homai' means 'Give me', 'te' means 'the' and 'pakipaki' means 'clap'. So I guess it's 'Give me the Clap'."
Nat: "So 'pakipaki' means 'clap clap'?"
Me: "No, it just means 'clap'."
Nat: "So if you want to say 'clap clap' you have to say 'pakipaki pakipaki'?"
Me: "I guess!"

Anyone care to correct us?

4 comments:

  1. just because pakipaki means "clap" I wouldn't think that it necessarily means it's restricted to literally ONE clap - surely, it's more like "clap" as in applause or "give them a hand" as well as just clap in general.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hehehehe...no matter what the truth is, Nat cracks me up.

    I suspect it would be "Homai nga pakipaki" ("the" plural instead of singular), rather than repeating "pakipaki" twice...pretty sure "pakipaki" also means "applause" and all its synonyms though (like many Maori words have multiple meanings). But I'm no expert.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Homai te Pakipaki doesn't restrict it to just one clap. Ana & Ange are right 'Pakipaki' means clap, applause etc.
    So 'Homai te Pakipaki' means "Give a round of applause."
    Good thinking on the 'nga' front Ange, it alot of cases you would have been on the money, but it's not necessary here.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks guys! I suspected you three would know. (And I also suspected that was the case but, you know).

    ReplyDelete

Thoughts?